1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
export let confession = `
Dear val.town overlords,
I pen this note with a heavy heart, for I have sinned. My folly unfolded amidst the
high-paced life of a val.town developer, where I danced too close to the flames of
concurrency, blinded by a mix of audacious hope and foolish courage.
Deep down in the foundational layers of my code, I knew that our sacred texts,
the guidelines of val.town, proclaim that fetchProxy was not built to support concurrency.
Yet, intoxicated by ambition and sprinkled with a dash of desperate creativity, I dared
to summon multiple instances of this sacred method.
Emboldened by my insubordination, I threw them into the tumultuous world, dispatching them
in an unrestrained frenzy. I dreamt of an orchestra of parallel operations, each blissfully
retrieving data from the sanctified servers beyond, and defying the fundamental laws of
single-threadedness.
To my surprise and secret delight, it worked! I should have been greeted by an error-storm,
each one a blazing reminder of my transgressions. Instead, I was met with successful
responses, each one a silently nodding accomplice to my disobedience.
Yet here I am, swamped with guilt. Despite my code running smoothly, the weight of my
transgressions bears heavily upon me. I see the sneaky shortcuts in my code, each one a
deceptively functional fetchProxy instance, and I can't help but feel like a sneaky
impostor, a charlatan.
I beseech you, val.town overlords, for guidance in my journey towards understanding and
respecting the limitations of fetchProxy. May the power of async and await continue to
guide me, and may I resist the seductive whispers of unsupported, yet seemingly functional,
concurrency.
Forgive me, val.town, for while I reaped success, I knew deep down that I had treaded on
shaky ground.
Yours in deepest regret,
A guilt-ridden coder
`;
πŸ‘† This is a val. Vals are TypeScript snippets of code, written in the browser and run on our servers. Create scheduled functions, email yourself, and persist small pieces of data β€” all from the browser.